Masakage Comparison Guide

by Kevin Kent January 31, 2018

Having trouble deciding which Masakage line is right for you? We understand, because we love them all too. Carbon steel, being a bit finicky  isn't for everyone. Other people are only interested in price point. Whatever your priorities, the chart below should help.

Knife Line
Blacksmith
Steel
Handle
Maintenance Rating
What we like about it
SteelStainless Steel
VG10 stainless steel
rockwell hardness: 60:62
HandleWa (Japanese) Handle
Octagon
Rosewood with pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingEasy, it's stainless steel
What we like about itElegant and sexy AF.

What's up with the name: Kumo translates to Cloud!
Blacksmithyoshimi kato
SteelStainless clad with Carbon Steel Core
aogami super super blue carbon
rockwell hardness: 63:64
HandleWa (Japanese) Handle
Octagon
Cherry wood handle with Pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingDoable, but some care needed
What we like about itCrazy bang for your buck, more Knifewear staff have Koishi's than any other knife line.

What's up with the name: Koishi translates to Pebble!
SteelCarbon Steel
#2 aogami blue carbon
rockwell hardness: 61:63
HandleWa (Japanese) Handle
Oval
Cherry wood handle with plastic collar
Maintenance RatingPain in the A$$
What we like about itPerformance with a cheap handle.

What's up with the name: Mizu translates to Water!
Blacksmithyoshimi kato
SteelStainless Steel
VG10 stainless steel
rockwell hardness: 60:62
HandleWa (Japanese) Handle
Oval
Magnolia wood handle with pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingEasy, it's stainless steel
What we like about itThe perfect gift knife, stainless, beautiful and well priced .

What's up with the name: Kiri translates to Mist!
Blacksmithyoshimi kato
SteelStainless clad with Carbon Steel Core
#2 shirogami white carbon
rockwell hardness: 61:63
HandleWa (Japanese) Handle
Oval
Magnolia wood handle with Pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingDoable, but some care needed
What we like about itAlmost as great as it's big brother, the Koishi, a great choice for someone getting into Japanese knives.

What's up with the name: Yuki translates to Snow!
Blacksmithyu kurosaki
SteelCarbon Steel
#2 shirogami white carbon
rockwell hardness: 61:63
HandleWa (Japanese) Handle
Octagon
Magnolia wood handle with Pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingPain in the A$$
What we like about itSharp as hell, will rust as you look at it, and thin as a razor. You will love it, but it won't love you back.

What's up with the name: Shimo translates to Frost!
Blacksmithtakeshi saji
SteelStainless clad with Carbon Steel Core
aogami super super blue carbon
rockwell hardness: 63:64
HandleWestern style handle
Desert Ironwood with welded bolster
Maintenance RatingDoable, but some care needed
What we like about itThe premo Masakage, Super Blue, Ironwood, and designed by Shibata-san to be pure luxury in a knife

What's up with the name: Named after this WW2 fighter Jet.
Kevin Kent
Kevin Kent

Kevin Kent’s fascination with Japanese knives began while he was working as sous-chef for the legendary chef Fergus Henderson at St. John restaurant in London, England. In 2007, he began selling handcrafted Japanese knives out of a backpack on the back of his bicycle, while working as a chef at River Café in Calgary, Canada. Kent is just as obsessed with Japanese knives as when he first held one, and a few times a year, he travels to Japan to meet with his blacksmith friends, to drink far too much sake, and to learn more about the ancient art of knife-making. Born and raised in Saskatchewan, he refuses to confess how many Japanese knives he owns….but he admits the number is rather high. Follow Kevin on Twitter @knifenerd


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