The Masakage Shimo Gyuto - Kevin's knife

June 27, 2019 2 min read 0 Comments

The Masakage Shimo Gyuto - Kevin's knife

"This is my Masakage Shimo gyuto. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My Masakage Shimo gyuto is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. Without me, my Masakage Shimo gyuto is useless. Without my Masakage Shimo gyuto, I am useless. I must sharpen my Masakage Shimo gyuto true."
-From a famous film about philosophical chefs in tight situations

This knife is made by Kurosaki san. He is a younger blacksmith, but just killing it now. He is making knives like an old master blacksmith can and he’s in his mid-forties. It’s clear that he loves making knives. 

The blade is fat and rugged enough for my restaurant abuse (please keep in mind that I’m not overly abusive on knives) and sharpens so easily that it’s always crazy sharp, like a white carbon laser beam. The carbon steel takes on a patina quickly and starts looking bad ass and unique quickly. I can pick mine from a lineup of 10 others. It is mine.

Kevin Kent's Masakage Shimo Gyuto

About the Blacksmith: Yu Kurosaki

Kurosaki-san started his blacksmithing career young. He dropped out of school at 16 to work in a car factory. Then, when he was only 17, he started working at Takefu Knife Village in Echizen. While he was there, he apprenticed under Hiroshi Kato and Katsushige Anryu before becoming the youngest Master Blacksmith in Knife Village.

In 2015, Kurosaki-san spread his wings and opened his own workshop. He built his factory and showroom on the other side of the Knife Village parking lot. Striking out on your own doesn’t mean you have to move across the country. The new workshop is clean, so clean. It hasn’t had the decades of coke dust, engine grease, and steel powder to make it a filthy, loveable mess yet. Give him time. The shop is also set up for speed. It is organized. Everything has a place and it’s all very logical. I like how he works. 

Kurosaki-san is the poster boy for the future of blacksmithing in Japan. His knives are sexy, cool and unique. He’s successful and stylish, and he has customers around the world.

Read more about Yu Kurosaki and Shop for a Masakage Shimo here.

Kevin Kent
Kevin Kent

Kevin Kent’s fascination with Japanese knives began while he was working as sous-chef for the legendary chef Fergus Henderson at St. John restaurant in London, England. In 2007, he began selling handcrafted Japanese knives out of a backpack on the back of his bicycle, while working as a chef at River Café in Calgary, Canada. Kent is just as obsessed with Japanese knives as when he first held one, and a few times a year, he travels to Japan to meet with his blacksmith friends, to drink far too much sake, and to learn more about the ancient art of knife-making. Born and raised in Saskatchewan, he refuses to confess how many Japanese knives he owns….but he admits the number is rather high. Follow Kevin on Twitter @knifenerd


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Knife Line
Blacksmith
Steel
Handle
Maintenance Rating
What we like about it
Whats in a name?
SteelStainless Steel
VG10 stainless steel
Rockwell Hardness: 60:62
HandleWa (Japanese) handle
Octagon, rosewood with pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingEasy, it's stainless steel.
What we like about itElegant and sexy AF.
Whats in a name?Kumo translates to Cloud!
Blacksmithyoshimi kato
SteelStainless clad with Carbon Steel Core
aogami super super blue carbon
Rockwell Hardness: 63:64
HandleWa (Japanese) handle
Octagon, cherry wood handle with pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingDoable, but some care needed.
What we like about itCrazy bang for your buck, more Knifewear staff have Koishi's than any other knife line.
Whats in a name?Koishi translates to Pebble!
SteelCarbon Steel
#2 aogami blue carbon
Rockwell Hardness: 61:63
HandleWa (Japanese) handle
Oval, cherry wood handle with plastic collar
Maintenance RatingPain in the ass.
What we like about itPerformance with a cheap handle.
Whats in a name?Mizu translates to Water!
Blacksmithyoshimi kato
SteelStainless Steel
VG10 stainless steel
Rockwell Hardness: 60:62
HandleWa (Japanese) Handle
Oval, Magnolia wood handle with pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingEasy, it's stainless steel.
What we like about itThe perfect gift knife, stainless, beautiful and well priced .
Whats in a name?Kiri translates to Mist!
Blacksmithyoshimi kato
SteelStainless clad with Carbon Steel Core
#2 shirogami white carbon
Rockwell Hardness: 61:63
HandleWa (Japanese) handle
Oval, magnolia wood handle with pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingDoable, but some care needed.
What we like about itAlmost as great as it's big brother, the Koishi, a great choice for someone getting into Japanese knives.
Whats in a name?Yuki translates to Snow!
Blacksmithyu kurosaki
SteelCarbon Steel
#2 shirogami white carbon
Rockwell Hardness: 61:63
HandleWa (Japanese) handle
Octagon, magnolia wood handle with pakka wood collar
Maintenance RatingPain in the ass.
What we like about itSharp as hell, will rust as you look at it, and thin as a razor. You will love it, but it won't love you back.
Whats in a name?Shimo translates to Frost!
Blacksmithtakeshi saji
SteelStainless clad with Carbon Steel Core
aogami super super blue carbon
Rockwell Hardness: 63:64
HandleWestern style handle
Desert ironwood with welded bolster
Maintenance RatingDoable, but some care needed.
What we like about itThe premo Masakage, Super Blue, Ironwood, and designed by Shibata-san to be pure luxury in a knife
Whats in a name?Named after this WW2 fighter Jet.